Five Signs Your Child is Ready for Piano Lessons

This is one of the most frequent questions I receive from parents of potential students. Children ideally begin piano when they are in elementary school, but depending on the child, that can be early elementary school or later. See if your child is exhibiting the following signs to help guide your decision to enroll them in private piano lessons.

Fine Motor Dexterity: Learning to play the piano is like doing a workout for your hands, fingers, and wrists. Generally, if your child can write with a pencil, use a pair of scissors, or hold a spoon or fork well during meals they are physically ready to take on piano lessons.

Focused Cognitive and Attention Skills: Attention and cognition are interrelated when it comes to learning to play the piano. Holding attention for 20-30 minutes on a specific task will allow the child to utilize thought processes to learn various concepts at the piano. Cognition directly impacts learning, and the piano will help develop your child’s thinking skills.

Alphabet/Counting Skills: If your child can recite the alphabet and count to ten easily, then this is a sign they are ready for piano lessons. Learning to read music is like learning a new language. The musical staff is the sentence, and the notes are the letters. A musical phrase is like a putting together a word. Keeping a beat and rhythmic accuracy is like using math. The interrelationship between the alphabet and counting is critical to the success of a beginner piano student.

Respecting Teachers: Children who have been in a school setting, with teachers, teacher’s aides, and other adults in counseling/advising roles have an advantage at the piano. They understand that the teacher is a person to help guide them in their studies, advise them to work out new concepts and techniques, encourage them to commit to their learning, and respectfully challenge them in a judgement-free zone.

Teachers are the keys to doors of discovery. It is their mission to equip their students with the skills and desire to open these doors.

Interest in Music: Music is all around us. Children are especially attuned to picking up rhythms, melodies, and feeling the urge to sing and dance. Tap into this natural desire and cultivate their musical potential with piano lessons. By setting small, attainable,  but challenging goals in lessons, the confidence boost in achievement is a propeller into more lofty goals. Including music in the students’ favorite style is just as important as following a method book. Take advantage of your child’s enthusiasm and let them ignite their passion for music!

Sound Off: What have you found to be a sign you or your child was ready for lessons? Comment below!

References:

http://www.andnextcomesl.com/2014/06/starting-piano-lessons-when-is-child.html

http://www.wisegeekhealth.com/what-is-the-connection-between-attention-and-cognition.htm

https://brendamueller.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/giving-a-music-student-an-opportunity-to-shine/

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Winter Recital 2015 | College Station Piano/Flute/Voice Teacher

Encore Music Studio put on a great show this weekend! Each student performed one or two musical selections, and worked through their nerves to perform for family, friends, and the residents at Bluebonnet Place, a local assisted living facility for the elderly.

Pieces included Ode to Joy, Sleigh Ride, Grandpa’s Clock, Kum-Ba-Yah, Away in a Manger, Silent Night, The Can-Can, Air from Overture in D Major, O Little Town of Bethlehem, Schumann’s Little Piece, Waltz from Sleeping Beauty, and Raindrop Prelude by Chopin.

Students each achieved their Encore performance credit for a successful recital. I look forward to their continued success in the months to come!

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Five Signs Your Child is Ready for Piano Lessons

This is one of the most frequent questions I receive from parents of potential students. Children ideally begin piano when they are in elementary school, but depending on the child, that can be early elementary school or later. See if your child is exhibiting the following signs to help guide your decision to enroll them in private piano lessons.

Fine Motor Dexterity: Learning to play the piano is like doing a workout for your hands, fingers, and wrists. Generally, if your child can write with a pencil, use a pair of scissors, or hold a spoon or fork well during meals they are physically ready to take on piano lessons.

Focused Cognitive and Attention Skills: Attention and cognition are interrelated when it comes to learning to play the piano. Holding attention for 20-30 minutes on a specific task will allow the child to utilize thought processes to learn various concepts at the piano. Cognition directly impacts learning, and the piano will help develop your child’s thinking skills.

Alphabet/Counting Skills: If your child can recite the alphabet and count to ten easily, then this is a sign they are ready for piano lessons. Learning to read music is like learning a new language. The musical staff is the sentence, and the notes are the letters. A musical phrase is like a putting together a word. Keeping a beat and rhythmic accuracy is like using math. The interrelationship between the alphabet and counting is critical to the success of a beginner piano student.

Respecting Teachers: Children who have been in a school setting, with teachers, teacher’s aides, and other adults in counseling/advising roles have an advantage at the piano. They understand that the teacher is a person to help guide them in their studies, advise them to work out new concepts and techniques, encourage them to commit to their learning, and respectfully challenge them in a judgement-free zone.

Teachers are the keys to doors of discovery. It is their mission to equip their students with the skills and desire to open these doors.

Interest in Music: Music is all around us. Children are especially attuned to picking up rhythms, melodies, and feeling the urge to sing and dance. Tap into this natural desire and cultivate their musical potential with piano lessons. By setting small, attainable,  but challenging goals in lessons, the confidence boost in achievement is a propeller into more lofty goals. Including music in the students’ favorite style is just as important as following a method book. Take advantage of your child’s enthusiasm and let them ignite their passion for music!

Sound Off: What have you found to be a sign you or your child was ready for lessons? Comment below!

References:

http://www.andnextcomesl.com/2014/06/starting-piano-lessons-when-is-child.html

http://www.wisegeekhealth.com/what-is-the-connection-between-attention-and-cognition.htm

https://brendamueller.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/giving-a-music-student-an-opportunity-to-shine/