Secrets to Success in Music Lessons: The Critical Role of Parents

Many students are very excited to learn to play an instrument like the piano, and when given the opportunity to develop their skills, they excel and find joy in music. But sometimes, students are put into a difficult position when the parent has unrealistic expectations of musical success, or an indifferent attitude of the small challenges their child has worked through on their instrument. In order for a child to truly succeed in their musical endeavors, parents must be fully involved in their child’s learning. Read below about what it takes to be a supportive and engaged music parent, even if you don’t know anything about music.

Encourage your child to learn, don’t force them. Parents are critical stakeholders in their child’s music education, but that doesn’t mean they should push their child’s limits. Children should be allowed to discover naturally, persevere through problems, feel curious, channel self-discipline in wanting to learn, be optimistic, and practice self-control.  They need to believe they have what it takes to conquer learning to read music and play an instrument. It is the role of the parent to encourage the child that they have the skills to figure things out.

Celebrate the little victories in practice time. Practicing an instrument is difficult and can be overwhelming at times. By taking the time to celebrate small achievements, such as playing the G Major scale hands together with correct fingering, a child is more likely to continue believing they can learn how to play an instrument. Parents should actively listen to their child practicing to pinpoint these small victories. Shower your child with praise when they get it right!

Find yourself on the piano bench with your child. When a child is going through a particularly hard time, sit with them at the piano bench. Frustration is something to work through with someone they are comfortable with, rather than alone. Ask your child what part is hard, or which line is confusing, and do your best to work through it with them. Tell them to take the lead in showing you how it is supposed to be done. Make it a point to diffuse the difficult situation by getting them to “teach” you the piece of music.

Regularly ask your child about how music lessons are going. By taking a bit of time out of our day to just ask our children how music lessons are going, their brains begin activating and firing. Keep music theory books and/or flashcards in the car, to take advantage of spare moments in traffic when they may be bored. Have them describe the most fun part of learning, as well as the most challenging. By vocalizing these concerns, children are more likely to be open to communicating with their parents about their music education.

Always bring your child to lessons on time and prepared. Parents who regularly bring their children to lessons on time and with all their books and materials have an easier time actively engaging their children in music lessons. Children don’t have any control over this, so it is up to the parent to be responsible. Leading by example is critical to communicating the importance of being on time and prepared for your child, and shows them that you care enough about their music education to make the effort to get them there eager and ready.

Converse with the teacher about your child’s progress. Make it a point to sit in a lesson every now and then, and ask the teacher how your child is doing. If talking in person isn’t an option, give the teacher a phone call, or send a quick email. Most teachers would be happy to talk more in detail about a student’s progress, and it will start a conversation about areas where they may be struggling and excelling.

Find common ground in learning an instrument. If you are a parent that took music lessons as a child, share these experiences with your children. Both positive and negative experiences are beneficial to a child to hear, as they can relate with the challenges they are currently facing when learning their instrument. Talk openly about how you felt when learning how to jump from middle to high register on a flute or trumpet, and encourage your child to keep working to accomplish these small goals.

Sound Off: When did you find you were most influential in helping your child with music lessons? Did you have actively involved parents when you were learning an instrument?

References:

http://news.illinois.edu/news/08/1113musician.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/9785373/The-secret-to-making-children-succeed-Dont-be-a-pushy-parent.html

http://www.academyofsound.org/parents

http://www.amparents.org/resources/beginning-music-parents/

 

Advertisements

You are Never Too Old to Learn to Play the Piano

Are you one of the 70% of adults who wish they had taken piano lessons? What about someone who wish they had studied longer than the five years your parents required? More and more adults are rediscovering the piano as a form of relaxation, self-expression, creativity, and a way to relate with their children. Read below about four reasons why you should consider taking piano lessons.

Pressure’s off. No one is forcing you to learn to play. By this reason alone, many adults find themselves enrolling in piano lessons. They want to rekindle their love for music, on their terms, and on their time. There is no pressure from parents, competition from friends or family members.

Steady, uninterrupted progress will happen. When adult learners consciously choose to learn to play the piano, practice comes very easily. Difficult passages become healthy challenges, and most adults don’t shy away from a challenge. For some very helpful practice tips, check out my post here.

You will be playing real piano pieces in a very short amount of time. My adult students learn from Alfred Piano Library’s Adult All-in-One Series. These spiral-bound books incorporate all lesson songs, technic, and theory necessary for an adult learner to swiftly begin playing the piano with ease. I believe it is also important to include modern, classical, romantic, pop, show tunes, duets, and sing-along pieces into the repertoire of the adult piano student. Tapping into these various genres of music keeps that passion for music growing.

If you are motivated to learn, knowledge and skill will come. It’s important to note that in order to succeed at something, you must have three things: motivation, knowledge, and skill. As your piano teacher, I will do everything in my power to supply you with the knowledge and technical skills to be a great piano student. The motivation part is where you come in! If you are motivated to play, excited for the challenge, and ready to learn, then piano will be a successful endeavor.

Sound Off: Are you ready to take on piano lessons? What age did you start playing piano?

References:

http://www.woutersmet.com/2014/02/24/7-reasons-you-are-never-too-old-to-learn-to-play-piano/

http://melaniespanswick.com/2013/07/13/are-you-ever-too-young-or-too-old/

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/1420649/Re:_50_too_old_to_start?.html

http://www.reddit.com/r/piano/comments/18954q/people_who_started_to_learn_the_piano_old_25/

http://www.seattletimes.com/lifestyle/youre-never-too-old-to-learn-a-musical-instrument/

http://artfacts.australiacouncil.gov.au/music/participation-7/20-of-kids-learn-to-play-music-70-of-adults-wish-they-had/

Early and Often: Music Education for Toddlers and the Very Young Child

As of late, many parents have contacted me about starting their toddlers and preschoolers (think 18 months to four years) in some kind of music class. As formal lessons may be much for a very young child to take on, group classes and a consistent exposure to music and music education in the home will spark the interest of the child in music. Check out my recommendations below to make music an everyday part of your child’s education.

Active versus Passive Music Listening. Passive listening includes having background music on during playtime or listening to the radio while in the car. This type of musical exposure is nice, but is not creating lasting neural connections in your young child’s brain. By incorporating movement: clapping, dancing, singing along, marching, or something similar, your child is remembering not just the fun they had while actively listening to music, but also the way music made them feel. They can replicate those feelings again when given the chance to express themselves through music.

Daily Activities Sing-Alongs. There is a reason why we have an Alphabet Song, Old MacDonald, and B-I-N-G-O. By learning how to spell, count, and make animal sounds through music, there is a higher chance that the young child will remember these concepts. The Alphabet Song in particular is set to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, another important children’s song that incorporates hand motions. As a parent of a toddler, I try to sing to my child at regular times throughout the day. At morning wake up, I sing, “It’s a Beautiful Day,” a simple tune I made up to prepare him for the day. But after singing it nearly every day for the last 18 months of his life, he has started to sing with me!

Movement and Music. Research has proven that incorporating movement into music for young children is remarkable for literacy, learning, and language skills. One of the leading providers of early childhood music education is Kindermusik, a tried and true method to begin a child’s music education. Their curriculum is developmentally-based, and each age from young infant to preschool is sure to enjoy the active and fun learning atmosphere that Kindermusik provides. Find the location nearest you here.

Parent and Child Parallel Learning. It is not unheard of for a parent to enroll in music lessons, just to give their very young child the exposure to music on a daily basis. For those parents who have pianos or guitars already in the home, consider enrolling in lessons, and make time to practice in front of your child. Sit them at the piano with you while you are playing, and explain simple concepts to them, like forte and piano, or high notes versus low notes. These concepts will be forged into their developing brains, so when it is time to enroll them into formal lessons around age 5, they will be ahead of the curve.

Sound Off: How did early exposure cultivate a love of music for you? What is your earliest musical memory?

References:

http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/learning/toddler_music.html#

http://www.kindermusik.com/about/

https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/6492/

http://music-for-toddlers.com/blog/music-lessons-for-kids/16-the-kodaly-method.html

http://www.classicsforkids.com/teachers/training/Kodaly101.asp

http://www.psychology.mcmaster.ca/ljt/anvari_et_al_2002.pdf

http://www.abcmusicandme.com/documents/impact_of_music_on_literacy.pdf

The Whole Child: Making the Case for Music Education

“The fact that children can make beautiful music is less significant than the fact that music can make beautiful children.” – Cheryl Lavender

A well-rounded education includes focus on the whole child, from physical and mental development, to emotional and social development. The highlight of music education is that it encompasses all facets of a whole child education, providing an outlet for expending physical energy, maturation of the entire brain, greater emotional intelligence and self-awareness, along with the skills needed to facilitate understanding  in various social groups. Let’s break it down into each of these areas and make the case for music education.

Physical Development. Learning to play an instrument has physical challenges, including gross and fine motor development. Children who begin their music education on the piano find they fatigue easily, noting the need for technical exercises to strengthen their wrists, hands, and fingers. Having proper posture will greatly aid in reducing fatigue at the piano, as well as having a persistent practice schedule. If a music student is involved in marching band, the physical development is even greater. Take a percussion student, who marches in the drum line with a snare drum attached to their body. They must keep time with their instrument, play intricate rhythms with proper form, while marching into various complicated formations with the rest of the band. Many times, marching bands practice and perform in inclement weather conditions, too! The physical conditioning and exercise gained by playing a musical instrument knows no bounds.

Mental Maturation. Take a look at the graphic below and see how music education can help make your child a more mentally mature individual.

Mental Benefits of Music Education

 

Emotional Intelligence. Emotional Intelligence, or Emotional Quotient (EQ) is the ability to understand and manage your emotional life, which in turn will affect the life of others around you. The music student is more apt to be patient, have a better attention span, and greater memory recall than those students who aren’t in music lessons. Music students understand the need to communicate more clearly, take responsibility for their actions, and learn self-control. Learning an instrument takes focus and determination, as results can take time to manifest.

Social Skills. Children involved in music lessons develop healthy relationships with their peers, have more self confidence, and are more emotionally mature than their counterparts. Music students are frequently using their social skills to remedy conflict, solve problems in class or on the field in sports. They understand that teamwork is the essence of success in large groups, referencing their participation in large ensembles like marching band or orchestra. Music is something that forms strong relationships between children, encouraging the creation of “garage bands” and singing groups, all working toward a common goal. All of these skills can be applied later in their adult life.

Sound Off: What facet of whole child education can you add to this list? How did music education prepare you for your life as a professional adult?

References:

http://supersimplelearning.com/blog/2013/06/07/weekend-reading-musics-effect-on-learning/

http://intheloopkids.bubblelife.com/community/intheloopkids_reporter/library/35658802/key/35596230/How_Group_Music_Lessons_Can_Boost_a_Childs_Emotional_Quotient

http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/arts-education-promotes-emotional-intelligence-6883

http://www.laphil.com/sites/default/files/media/pdfs/shared/education/yola/susan-hallam-music-development_research.pdf

http://www.dci.org/

Four Reasons Music Lessons Benefit the Child Athlete

“Music lessons are not for my son, he is an athlete.”

“My daughter isn’t artsy enough to play music.”

“We are a football family, we aren’t musically-inclined.”

These are all phrases that come to mind when I talk about the benefits of learning and playing an instrument to parents of athletic children.  Athletics are essential to the physical and mental growth of children, but what can music lessons do for the athletic child? Let’s take a look:

Learning to play an instrument can increase the athletic child’s dedication to practice, commitment to learning and overcoming obstacles, and build confidence. The piano, for instance, has the challenges of learning to read music, remembering symbols, utilizing fine motor skills in the hands, wrists, and fingers, and controlling all of those on a keyboard of 88-keys! Imagine the mental and physical stimulation your child receives when taking piano lessons.  Transferring these into their chosen sport can positively influence their training.

Learning to play a wind instrument (clarinet, flute, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet, tuba, trombone, oboe, and others) can greatly enhance lung capacity and breath control. The connection here was recently discussed by Aaron Perdue, a professional flutist and endurance runner, on NPR and American Public Media’s Performance Today. There are many endurance athletes (triathletes, swimmers, runners, etc.) who are also wind instrument players, noting the benefits of conditioning, disciplined practice, and the ability to manipulate their bodies to achieve desired results as the greatest links between endurance athletics and playing an instrument.

Learning to play an instrument can help make the athletic child more patient and persistent to achieve desired results. Long-term goals are something that the athletic child is all too familiar. The long distance runner slowly but surely increases their distances over long periods of time to eventually reach their running goal. Patience and the ability to see past current challenges is essential in training and conditioning. Just as learning to play an instrument takes time to master, such is the time to become a good athlete.

Learning an instrument provides the athletic child an outlet for personal expression/emotional release.  Athletic children may be surrounded by a results-only environment for the majority of their day, without a dedicated way to express their emotions. Music lessons provide a way for these children to get in touch with their creative and expressive side, in a safe and controlled space. A study was recently published noting the positive effects of music lessons on attention skill, anxiety management and emotional control. By exposing your athletic child to  music lessons, you are training the brain to be emotionally mature.

Sound off: Are you an athlete? Did you take music lessons when you were younger? What was your experience being an athlete and musician?

References:

http://www.linkedin.com/in/cjjaffe/en

http://www.wikihow.com/Increase-Your-Lung-Capacity

http://performancetoday.publicradio.org/display/web/2015/01/28/young-artist-in-residence-aaron-purdue

http://graphic.pepperdine.edu/sports/2005/2005-02-03-exploring.htm

http://www.underwateraudio.com/blog/hold-your-breath-surprising-tips-on-increasing-lung-capacity/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/01/07/music-lessons-spur-emotional-and-behavioral-growth-in-children-new-study-says/

http://www.jaacap.com/article/S0890-8567%2814%2900578-4/abstract