The Whole Child: Making the Case for Music Education

“The fact that children can make beautiful music is less significant than the fact that music can make beautiful children.” – Cheryl Lavender

A well-rounded education includes focus on the whole child, from physical and mental development, to emotional and social development. The highlight of music education is that it encompasses all facets of a whole child education, providing an outlet for expending physical energy, maturation of the entire brain, greater emotional intelligence and self-awareness, along with the skills needed to facilitate understanding  in various social groups. Let’s break it down into each of these areas and make the case for music education.

Physical Development. Learning to play an instrument has physical challenges, including gross and fine motor development. Children who begin their music education on the piano find they fatigue easily, noting the need for technical exercises to strengthen their wrists, hands, and fingers. Having proper posture will greatly aid in reducing fatigue at the piano, as well as having a persistent practice schedule. If a music student is involved in marching band, the physical development is even greater. Take a percussion student, who marches in the drum line with a snare drum attached to their body. They must keep time with their instrument, play intricate rhythms with proper form, while marching into various complicated formations with the rest of the band. Many times, marching bands practice and perform in inclement weather conditions, too! The physical conditioning and exercise gained by playing a musical instrument knows no bounds.

Mental Maturation. Take a look at the graphic below and see how music education can help make your child a more mentally mature individual.

Mental Benefits of Music Education

 

Emotional Intelligence. Emotional Intelligence, or Emotional Quotient (EQ) is the ability to understand and manage your emotional life, which in turn will affect the life of others around you. The music student is more apt to be patient, have a better attention span, and greater memory recall than those students who aren’t in music lessons. Music students understand the need to communicate more clearly, take responsibility for their actions, and learn self-control. Learning an instrument takes focus and determination, as results can take time to manifest.

Social Skills. Children involved in music lessons develop healthy relationships with their peers, have more self confidence, and are more emotionally mature than their counterparts. Music students are frequently using their social skills to remedy conflict, solve problems in class or on the field in sports. They understand that teamwork is the essence of success in large groups, referencing their participation in large ensembles like marching band or orchestra. Music is something that forms strong relationships between children, encouraging the creation of “garage bands” and singing groups, all working toward a common goal. All of these skills can be applied later in their adult life.

Sound Off: What facet of whole child education can you add to this list? How did music education prepare you for your life as a professional adult?

References:

http://supersimplelearning.com/blog/2013/06/07/weekend-reading-musics-effect-on-learning/

http://intheloopkids.bubblelife.com/community/intheloopkids_reporter/library/35658802/key/35596230/How_Group_Music_Lessons_Can_Boost_a_Childs_Emotional_Quotient

http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/arts-education-promotes-emotional-intelligence-6883

http://www.laphil.com/sites/default/files/media/pdfs/shared/education/yola/susan-hallam-music-development_research.pdf

http://www.dci.org/

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